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Why Doesn't Public School Start at Birth?

Homepage Forums Brain-Based Learning Q&A Why Doesn't Public School Start at Birth?

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    • #71917
      Karan Young, M.Ed.
      Participant

      As a former owner of a highly successful pre-school program abroad, I love this article. It is very insightful. Early education is so critical for further success and development. I am lucky to follow several of my former students. We started together at age 2 and many are now in college. Parent have told me that they credit our school with setting their children on the right path for life. While most of my clients were affluent, the strategies and techniques of my program could be replicated to serve in a public setting. This article details the enormous benefits on society as a result of early intervention programs. While the initial cost of education young children can be costly, the effects can be felt for decades. High quality education at the earliest stage when the brain is at its highest rate of growth makes a tremendous amount of success. I hope to see programs embracing this notion in every city very soon.

      Article: https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/12/why-doesnt-public-school-start-at-birth/510428/


    • #72000
      Lisa Baker
      Member

      I could agree with you or this article more! Early education when the brain is under tremendous growth is the most critical part of a person’s education. High quality enrichment and education could mean a savings of millions of dollars over a life time. Unfortunately, it can take years if not decades for those savings to be seen. Most districts are looking for a quick fix and “return on investment”. However there is hope and research that is supporting early education. Here is an article from NPR-ED : http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/12/27/504712171/we-learned-a-lot-in-2016-about-how-preschool-can-help-kids?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=2055. It highlights a study of the preschool program in Oklahoma. The findings suggest that early education does have a lasting impact but only if the program is a good quality program. Programs that tend to be just glorified baby-sitting do not seem to have the same lasting effect. Funding is not as much of an issue as a commitment to see that quality early education as a critical need. I hope that in the next few years we will see this country embrace the idea of providing all children with a solid start in their educational career.


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